General, Licensing

OFFICE 365 Licensing – Enterprise

Office 365 Enterprise E1

This entry level version of Microsoft’s software is the least expensive of the plans, at £6 per month per user. Your users must have an Internet connection to use E1 because this version does not include installed versions of the applications.

If your organization has people working out in the field, relying on tablet computers or smartphones to do their work, E1 is not for you because it does not install applications on mobile devices either. You do get online versions of familiar Office products, such as Excel, PowerPoint and Word. Each user gets 1 TB for storing and sharing data, as well as 50 GB per inbox with Microsoft’s business-class email, calendar and contacts.

Office 365 Enterprise E3

Microsoft’s midrange plan costs £17.60 per month per user. The main benefit here over the less expensive E1 and ProPlus plans is that this includes fully installed Office applications: Excel, Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, Publisher, OneNote as well as Skype for Business.

You can install these applications on as many as five PCs or Macs and on up to 5 mobile phones and 5 tablets per user. Being a cloud services solution, there are also online versions of Excel, Word and PowerPoint and other Office apps, so your users will not have to rely on devices with software already installed.

Office 365 Enterprise E5

For maximum flexibility and horsepower, you’ll want to go with the E5 plan. It costs £30.80 per month per user. In addition to a full installation of all Office applications on users’ devices, you gain access to advanced security to protect your organization’s data against heretofore unseen malware and viruses, with additional protection against zero-day exploits.

E5 is the only plan that includes analytics tools. It is also the sole version that enables PSTN conferencing to facilitate Skype for Business meetings by letting participants connect over mobile phones or landlines. For companies that require more communications options, E5 also includes cloud PBX services to give you cloud-based call management (placing, receiving and transferring calls on multiple devices).

Office 365 ProPlus

The ProPlus version of Office 365 requires a monthly fee of £11.50, making it a suitable compromise between the E1 and E3 plans in terms of price. The main distinction here is that ProPlus has enterprise features but no email.

If your organization already has a preferred client for email or relies on webmail, this may be the best plan for you from a budget perspective. Likewise, if you already have an employee portal or dashboard in place, you won’t miss the fact that Office 365 ProPlus lacks an intranet site, corporate social networking or a corporate video portal. Companies that need advanced security or analytics tools should skip ProPlus and go with the E5 solution.

Office365

Advertisements
General, Licensing

What is Microsoft 365?

Microsoft 365 is a complete, intelligent solution for our commercial customers to empower everyone to be creative and work together, securely. Microsoft 365 Enterprise is the offering for our enterprise customers and Microsoft 365 Business is the offering for small and medium-sized businesses.

Microsoft 365 Enterprise includes Office 365 Enterprise, Windows 10 Enterprise, Enterprise Mobility + Security. Microsoft 365 Business is a new solution designed for small and medium-sized businesses, available in public preview, bringing together the best-in-class productivity and collaboration capabilities of Office 365 with device management and security solutions to safeguard business data.

Microsoft 365 E3 Microsoft 365 E5
  • Office 365 E3
  • Windows 10 Enterprise E3
  • Enterprise Mobility + Security E3
  • Office 365 E5
  • Windows 10 Enterprise E5
  • Enterprise Mobility + Security E5

 

Microsoft 365 Education includes Office 365, Windows 10, Enterprise Mobility + Security, and Minecraft: Education Edition to empower educators to unlock creativity, promote teamwork, and provide a simple and safe experience in a single, affordable solution built for education.

Microsoft 365 Education A3 Microsoft 365 Education A5
  • Windows 10 Education A3
  • Microsoft Office 365 A3
  • Enterprise Mobility + Security E3
  • Minecraft: Education Edition
  • Windows 10 Education A5
  • Microsoft Office 365 A5
  • Enterprise Mobility + Security E5
  • Minecraft: Education Edition
General

Switching between Core edition and Full GUI in Server 2016

In Windows Server 2016, you can no longer add or remove the GUI elements after the
operating system installation. In addition, there is no Minimal Server Interface option, as in Windows Server 2012 R2. This means that, at installation time, you must choose between a full graphical interface, similar to that of Windows 10, and a command line only. In Windows Server 2012 R2, it was possible to install and configure the server using the full GUI option, and then remove GUI features once the server was up and running. This is no longer possible.

General

System Center Configuration Manager SCCM Collection Queries

Some of the useful queries we used and still being used;

Client Collections

Collection for all Workstations.

  select

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID, SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name, SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client

from SMS_R_System where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like

“%workstation%”

 

Collection of all Windows 10 clients.

  select

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID, SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name, SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from

SMS_R_System

where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like “%workstation 10.0%”

Collection of all Windows 8.1 clients.

  select

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID, SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name, SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from

SMS_R_System

where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like “%workstation 6.3%”

Collection of all Windows 8 clients.

This query need to be limited to the All Workstations collection to work. If not it will also have Windows Server 2012 members as they share the same version number.

  select

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID, SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name, SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from

SMS_R_System

where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like “%workstation 6.2%”

 

Collection of all Windows 7 clients.

This query need to be limited to the All Workstations collection to work. If not it will also have Windows Server 2008 R2 members as they share the same version number.

  select

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID, SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name, SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from

SMS_R_System

where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like “%workstation 6.1%”

 

Collection for all Servers.

  select

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID, SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name, SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client

from SMS_R_System where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like

“%server%”

 

Collection of all Windows 2012 R2 Servers.

  select

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID, SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name, SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from

SMS_R_System

where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like “%Server 6.3%”

 

Collection of all Windows 2012 Servers.

  select SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID, SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name, SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from

SMS_R_System

where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like “%Server 6.2%”

 

Collection of all Windows 2008 R2 Servers.

  select SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID, SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name, SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup, SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from

SMS_R_System

where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like “%Server 6.1%”

 

Collection of all Domain Controllers.

This query requires that the config manager client is installed and hardware inventory is turned on.

  select *  from  SMS_R_System inner join SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM on SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM.ResourceId = SMS_R_System.ResourceId

where SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM.Roles like “%Domain_Controller%”

All Hewlet-Packard Systems

  select

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name,SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client

from SMS_R_System inner join SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM on

SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM.ResourceId = SMS_R_System.ResourceId

where SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM.Manufacturer like “Hewlett-Packard%”

or SMS_G_System_COMPUTER_SYSTEM.Manufacturer like “HP%”

All Physical Systems

  select SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup,

SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from SMS_R_System inner join SMS_G_System_SYSTEM_ENCLOSURE on SMS_G_System_SYSTEM_ENCLOSURE.ResourceID = SMS_R_System.ResourceId

where SMS_G_System_SYSTEM_ENCLOSURE.ChassisTypes = “23” or

SMS_G_System_SYSTEM_ENCLOSURE.ChassisTypes = “17”

 

SQL Server Collection Query

select SMS_R_System.ResourceId, SMS_R_System.ResourceType, SMS_R_System.Name, SMS_R_System.SMSUniqueIdentifier, SMS_R_System.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup, SMS_R_System.Client from SMS_R_System inner join SMS_G_System_ADD_REMOVE_PROGRAMS on SMS_G_System_ADD_REMOVE_PROGRAMS.ResourceID = SMS_R_System.ResourceId inner join SMS_G_System_ADD_REMOVE_PROGRAMS_64 on SMS_G_System_ADD_REMOVE_PROGRAMS_64.ResourceID = SMS_R_System.ResourceId where SMS_G_System_ADD_REMOVE_PROGRAMS.DisplayName like “Microsoft SQL Server 200%” or SMS_G_System_ADD_REMOVE_PROGRAMS_64.DisplayName like “Microsoft SQL Server 20%”

 

All Windows Workstations

Select

SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name,SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from SMS_R_System where SMS_R_System.OperatingSystemNameandVersion like ‘Microsoft Windows NT%Workstation%’

 

All Systems with HyperV Role

select SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name,SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from SMS_R_System  inner join SMS_G_System_SERVICE on SMS_G_System_SERVICE.ResourceID = SMS_R_System.ResourceId  where SMS_G_System_SERVICE.DisplayName like “Hyper-V Virtual Machine Management”

 

SCCM All Laptops Collection

select SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name,SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from SMS_R_System inner join SMS_G_System_SYSTEM_ENCLOSURE on SMS_G_System_SYSTEM_ENCLOSURE.ResourceID = SMS_R_System.ResourceId where   SMS_G_System_SYSTEM_ENCLOSURE.ChassisTypes in ( “8”, “9”, “10”, “14” )

 

 

 

 

 

General

Provisioning Services – Cache Options

How to access these options?

These cache options I have previously mentioned can be accessed via the properties of the vDisk. (To create one go to Store, right click and choose create a new vDisk)

PVS1

Under access mode, if it is showing Private Image, cache type will be grayed out which is saying vDisk is currently in used and you can’t change this option. When you change the Access mode to Standard Image then you have options available;

PVS2

General

Windows Server 2016 Editions, Pricing, Availability, Features

Server-2016-TP5

Windows Server 2016 is the next version of Microsoft’s server operating system. Being developed in line with Windows 10, its first technical preview came out in October 2014. The OS is still in beta stage but Microsoft has finally confirmed its final release.

Along with this news, Microsoft has also delineated how Windows Server 2016 will be serviced going forward. In earlier versions of Windows Server, it was serviced and supported with a “5+5” model meaning that there will be 5 years of mainstream support and 5 years of extended support. This continues with Windows Server 2016 as well, the only difference being the nomenclature. Customers who choose to install full Windows Server 2016 with a Desktop GUI or Server Core will maintain the same servicing experience which will be known as Long Term Servicing Branch (LTSB).

Windows Server 2016 Editions

windows-server-2016-editions

Windows Server comes in 3 main editions:

  1. Datacenter Edition: Donning all the basic capabilities of Windows Server, this edition will provide substantial efficacy to the Organization with a requirement for unlimited virtualization coupled with robust new features.
  2. Standard Edition: Quintessential for Organization with a need for limited virtualization, this model brings forth a general purpose yet a sturdy Server Operating System.
  3. Essentials: Targeted for smaller Organization comprising no more than 50 users, this edition provides limited capabilities as per your requirement.

Windows Server 2016 MultiPoint Premium Server, Windows Storage Server 2016 and Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2016 are the other editions.

General, Powershell

Get Last Reboot Date and Time – PowerShell

One of the most common questions asked when working with projects either for patching or testing or any other reason is when servers last rebooted. I have found the WMI class which will give us what we need.

Win32_OperatingSystem

So what can I get out of this class?

Get-WMIObject Win32_OperatingSystem | Get-Member

Get-CimInstance Win32_OperatingSystem | Get-Member

There is a difference we will see. Look at the definitions. This will reflect to their output.

LASTWMI

LastCIM

and LastBootUpTime what we need and we need to pull this info out of here;

Get-WMIObject -ClassName win32_OperatingSystem | select csname, lastbootuptime

csname                 lastbootuptime
——                  ————–
USER-PC             20160707090526.982130+060

And

Get-CimInstance -ClassName win32_OperatingSystem | select csname, lastbootuptime

csname                  lastbootuptime
——                   ————–
USER-PC               7/7/2016 9:05:26 AM

So looks like we need to convert the time if you use Get-WMIObject

>$wmi = gwmi win32_operatingsystem
>$wmi.ConvertToDateTime($wmi.LastBootUpTime)

or

$LastBootUpTime = Gwmi Win32_OperatingSystem -Comp server01 | Select -Exp LastBootUpTime
[System.Management.ManagementDateTimeConverter]::ToDateTime($LastBootUpTime)
or

>gwmi win32_operatingsystem | %{ $_.ConvertToDateTime($_.LastBootUpTime) }

or

>$BootTime = Invoke-Command -Cn server01, server02`
  -Command { (gwmi win32_operatingsystem).lastbootuptime }
>$BootTime | foreach { ([wmi]'').ConvertToDateTime($_) }

Why do you need to go through these conversions, just use Get-CimInstance...

>$BootTimes = Get-CimInstance -Cn server1, server2-Class Win32_OperatingSystem |
    Select PSComputerName, LastBootUpTime

>$BootTimes | Format-Table -AutoSize

PSComputerName LastBootUpTime       
-------------- --------------       
server1        8/18/2016 15:40:32 PM 
server2        8/19/2016 20:50:53 PM
 If you have got a few servers put them in a txt file  (serverlist.txt) and use;

$compname = Get-Content -Path C:\serverlist.txt
foreach ($comp in $compname) {
    Get-WmiObject win32_operatingsystem -ComputerName $comp | '
select CSName, @{LABEL='LastBootUpTime';'
EXPRESSION={$_.ConverttoDateTime($_.lastbootuptime)}}

}